Nitric Oxide is a naturally occurring molecule that was first identified in the late 18th century. NO should not be confused with Nitrous Oxide, a common anesthetic that is otherwise known as "laughing gas." Nitric Oxide's significance in biological processes began to materialize only in the late 1980s. Today, it is widely recognized as an important biological regulator and a fundamental molecule in the fields of pulmonary medicine, cardiology, neuroscience, physiology and immunology. In 1998, the Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded for discoveries concerning NO as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system.

Inhaled Nitric Oxide is presently used to treat thousands of patients per year in the US, including term infants with pulmonary hypertension and some pre-term infants with respiratory insufficiency. Inhaled Nitric Oxide is a potent, pulmonary specific vasodilator that dilates blood vessels.

Numerous academic sponsored clinical trials have demonstrated the clinical utility of NO and potential uses for NO in an extensive variety of diseases and health complications, including: inflammatory disorders; head trauma; erectile dysfunction; pain and neuroprotection.

Once inhaled into the lungs, NO causes blood vessels to relax and widen, resulting in an increase in blood flow. This increase in blood flow allows tissues to receive more oxygen. Once tissues receive more oxygen, the cells within the tissues become available to provide energy for all activities that organisms perform, both actively and passively. NO exerts its’ properties locally and is metabolized quickly, thus minimizing systemic adverse reactions associated with other vasodilators. Vasodilator therapies are widely used in hospital settings for patients with pulmonary and cardiac diseases. Although these

therapies are both safe and effective, they are cumbersome to use and prohibitively expensive. Because of the lack of transportability and the expense, NO is not often used in underdeveloped countries where there is significant need for NO therapy. Current providers of NO use large tanks of compressed gas that contain NO diluted in pure nitrogen.

Nu-Med believes there is a significant marketplace for its’ inhaled NO medical therapies. Currently available NO delivery systems are a concern for hospitals due to usage, tracking, storage and the necessity of returning empty compressed gas tanks. In addition, existing systems are large and awkward to use, impairing patient mobility within the hospital, and making inhaled Nitric Oxide outside the hospital environment nearly impossible. Nu-Med’s planned NO delivery systems are expected to be smaller, more portable and easier to use, and available at significantly lower price points than systems currently available.

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* Nu-Med's Nitric Oxide delivery systems are investigational and limited by federal law to investigational use only. Our units will require testing and FDA approval prior to any commercial use.